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michael hayden who ran the national security agency when some of our allies phones were attacked. we'll get analysis from david ignatious of the "washington post," david sanger of the "new york times." cbs news chief legal correspondent jan crawford and cbs news political director john dickerson. as we approach the 50th anniversary of the kennedy assassination we'll talk to former "life" magazine editor dick stolen and granddaughter of abe da bra ma'am zaputa it's a lot but that's what we do at "face the nation." >> schieffer: good morning again we welcome to the broadcast the chairman of the senate intelligence committee california senator diane feinstein. thank you so much, senator, for coming. you have been a big defender from the beginning of the national security agency but you were clearly upset with the revelation that we were tapping german chancellor angla merkel's cell phone, you said it was a big problem that the empty was unaware. do you believe that that the president didn't know this was happening? >> i can't answer that. i don't know. but i think where allies are
ferrari has our story. >> a bipartisan group of lawmakers, curtail the national security agency's indistric indiscriminate,. >> james sensenbrenner. , provides stronger restrictions against who the nsa can target when it comes to spying and require the government to delete information it collects accidentally, more aggressively than it does now. the bill reportedly has a dozen co-sponsors in the senate and 70 in the house. meanwhile senator dianne feinstein, the democratic head of the intelligence committee, in a statement feinstein said i am totally opposed to nsa surveillance of u.s. allies. it is abundantly clear that a total review of all intelligence programs is necessary. the white house says that president obama was not aware of just how extensive the nsa's intelligence gathering was until this summer but the president insists there will be a complete review of the nsa's spying policy. >> what we've seen over the last several years is their capacity has continued to develop and expand and that's why i'm initiating a review to make sure that what they're able to do doesn't
and a new plan to kill them. ♪ so barack obama ordered a review of national security agency intelligence operations saying more constraints are needed. the u.s. spying program has come under fierce criticism overall gagss of nsa had been monitoring millions of citizens and heads of state around the world and we have more. >> reporter: the u.s. government practice of listening in on the phone calls of leaders of allied countries could be about to end. in an interview president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose, to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure that what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean it's what they should be doing. this is prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of angela merkel's phone in 2010. anonymous officials say that is not true and that a white house review only discovered the surveillance of world leaders in the summer and say the bugging of merkel's phone and soon after. a delegation from the european parliament that is vi
officials testify on national security agency surveillance programs followed by a hearing onthe washington -- shooting -- the shooting at the washington naval yard. next, the house intelligence onmittee hearing testimony the national security agency intelligence programs in the u.s. and abroad. witnesses included national intelligence agency director james clapper and homeland security department officials. this hearing is two-and-a-half hours. >> i remind all guests that i will only accept civil the koran and only those recognized to speak will be allowed to speak andhe core him --decorum only those recognized to speak will be allowed to speak. i would like to recognize our first panel today. director of national intelligence james clapper james clapper,, deputy attorney the deputyes cole, director of the nsa, chris inglis. we will move immediately into the second panel of non- governmental experts knowledgeable on fisa issues. we will discuss possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice. i hope all of our witnesses will give clear answers about
.s. president barack obama ordered a review of the national security agency intelligence operations acknowledging more constraints are needed and he is being criticized over the nsa tapped angela merkel's phone and snooped on other european allies and we have more. >> reporter: the practice of listening in on the phone calls of the leaders of allied countries could be about to end. in an interview president barack obama says that national security operations generally have one purpose, to make sure the american people are safe. but i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they are able to do doesn't necessarily mean it's what they should be doing. this is prompted by reports in germany that president obama was briefed on the surveillance of chancellor merkel's known in 2010. administration officials say it's not true and a white house review only discovered the surveillance of world leaders in the summer and say the bugging of merkel's phone and soon after. a delegation from the european parliament visiting washington is worried about the surveillance of 10s of millions of its
.s. national security agency is denying reports that the spy agency tapped into google and yahoo data centres. a report in the "the washington post" cited documents leaked from edward snowden. the latest comes as a delegation from the yurp een -- european parliament visits washingtoning to -- washington to investigate claims on spying. >> the damage for the united states is so high, something has to be done on that. i hope it will be successful. we need messages for the people that without any purpose it can't happen on citizens. >> earlier this year a 16-year-old girl was gank raped as she walked home. in a few minutes we go to kenya's capital where women's rights campaigners demand her attackers be punished. >> and in india - scenes like this scare off foreign investors. but it's time to increase the minimum wage. [ ♪ music ] >>> hello again. the top stories on al jazeera: soldiers in the democratic republic of congo have retaken the last town held by rebels. people in bunagana celebrated with troops after they flushed out the m23 fighters following an 18-month rebellion. >> a trial of t
the national security agency and spying on foreign allied leaders has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home? at first glance this is a story that is less about ethics and more about power. the great power gap between the united states and other countries, even rich european ones. the most illuminating response came from the former foreign minister of france. he said in a radio interview, let's be honest. we eavesdrop, too. everyone is listening to everyone else. he went on to add, "we don't have the same means as the united states which makes us jealous." america spends tens of billions of dollars on intelligence collection. it's hard to get data to make good comparisons but it is safe to assume that washington's intelligence budget dwarfs that of other countries just as it does with defense spending. it is particularly strange that this rift should develop between the united states and its closest allies in europe. it was predictable and in fact in a sens
and whenever we found mistakes the court addressed and corrected them. the national security agency's is typically as part of the intelligence community broadly is an honorable institution. the men and women who do this work are honorable people dedicated to conducting the mission lawfully and are appalled by any wrongdoing. they too are citizens of this nation who care just as much about privacy and constitutional rights as the rest of us. they should be commended for their important work in protecting the people of the country which has been made all the more difficult by unauthorized damage of disclosure. that'll safely in the i see stand ready to work to adjust authorities to protect our privacy since civil liberties. i think their principles we already agree on. first must protect our sources targets and relationships and a better job of helping the american people understand what we do and why we do it and most importantly the recursive oversight that insures we do it correctly. third we must take every opportunity to demonstrate a commitment to respond to respecting the civil
, deputy attorney general james cole, national security agency director, keith alexander, deputy director of the nsa, chris england. following the first panel, moving immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing is an open forum to discuss potential amendments to the foreign intelligence surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how proposals under consideration in congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks before they occur. i encourage members to ask questions about fisa amendments and nsa programs, but today i'm going to submit my statement for the record in order to ask some questions following opening statements in relation to some of the news of the day when you get things clarified for the record which is important for the american people. we go about our business and expect a vote. we'll hold as long as we can, take a brief intermissio
for the national security agency denied reports in the german press that the president had had conversations about intelligence gathering related to the german chancer will, angela merkel, of course saying that had not happened. of course they were very specific in that press release, so it's not clear who else may have talked to the president. but right now we have foreign leaders asking for action at the united nations. it's the stuff of spy novels come live and real right before your eyes. >> it is indeed. randall thing you very much. >>> members of congress also said to be taking a closer look at the white house drone policy strikes today. they have invited a pakistani family that says they were victimized by a strike. they want them to share their story. they first stoke though to al jazeera kimberly halkett. >> it happened a little more than a year ago. for the 12-year-old and the 9-year-old the memories are still vivivid. >> i saw these bright lights fall from the sky and hit my grandmother. i looked at my hand and there was blood coming out of my hand. >> it was as many day become night, a
of the national security agency which as you know are under fire since the revelation by former nsa analyst edward snowden that revealed documents that showed that they had been listen together phone conversation or scooping up the phone numbers of conversation of american citizens. the director of national intelligence said that the information was gathered legally, and the content is only available to a handful of people. >> everything that we do on this program is audited 100%. on the business records. 100%. the da data is kept separate frm all the other data we have. it's important to understand that the leaker did not have access to this data period. >> so randall, are these hearings setting the stage for the usa freedom act, and if so what would that legislation mean? what would it entail? >> reporter: well, yes, indeed. the hearings are setting the stage for the freedom act. the freedom act would be an amendment of the patriot okay, and what it would not do is restrict the power of the nsa to gather intelligence but plays some new rules. for example, it would end the "dragnet" collection of
on to tellwusa9.com. cast your vote and leave your comment. >> the washington post reports the national security agency secretly collects information that goes between the data centers of yahoo and google. the newspaper sites documents from contractor, ed snowden. those documents indicate the information collected by the nsa includes text, audio, and video. general keith alexander does dispute the post story. he says the nsa is not breaking into any data bases, but he does say google and yahoo are compelled to work with the government. >>> just moments ago, the jury began deliberations in the sean taylor murder trial. the washington redskins star was gunned down in his florida home in a botched burglar back in 2007 and on trial in miami, the alleged trigger man, eric rivera, prosecutors say rivera and four of his friends broke into taylor's house saying the place would be empty. >> tonight the suspects and three armed robberies and two days in montgomery county are at large. as kristin fisher reports, the latest happened early this morning at the cbs on tuckerman lane. >> two masked men, one w
of state john kerry weighs in on the spy activities of the national security agency, saying the n.s.a. went too far. >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm david shuster, here is a look at the headlines - witnesses describe chaos in terminal 3 of los angeles international airport after a gunman opened fire this morning morning. this video from tmz showed people running after hearing the shots. an agent was killed. several others were wounded. the federal bureau of investigation identified the gunman as 23-year-old paul ciancia of pennsville new jersey. president obama said he and nouri al-maliki, iraqi prime minister shook hands and discussed how the two can work together to fight al qaeda. nouri al-maliki is seeking military aid from the united states to fight the sebbing tare have been violence. >> a u.s. drone missile attack killed this man, hakimullah mehsud, one of the c.i.a.'s most wanted men. the u.s. accused him of killing thousands, and put a $5 million bounty on his head. hakimullah mehsud was suspected of planning an attack killing employees at a u.s. base in afghanistan. th
that the national security agency is opening the laws and regulations that we put on them. we probably need to be able to have more transparency about what the foreign surveillance court is up to so that we can lay to rest the accusation that they are just a rubber stamp or that they don't actively double check what the national security agency is up to. so we have a communications challenge that we have got to get out there. that is not to say there is not substance. it is going to be debated. reasonable people can come down on either side of the debate, but that is what is going to be going on in congress this fall is trying to reconcile all of these competing interests. host: michael from las vegas, independent line, hi. caller: as i was telling the person who took my call, i ran who a chap in las vegas gave me suspicion that he might be a terrorist. i tried to call home and security, and it was impossible to get through. nobody answered the phone. i try to get a letter to them, i cannot get any communication. now, what does one do in a case like that? i had a very serious reason why thi
security agency is conducting surveillance, on american citizens within the united states. specifically under the u.s. patriot act which was passed after 9/11, and the national intelligence directors, clapper, james clapper and alexander will be trying to describe to what degrees they have complied with the law. they insist and they just recently actually overnight released several declassified documents trying to show that they have been complied with the directives of the secret u.s. foreign surveillance intelligence court. and that in one instance, several instances where they did exceed the boundaries allowed by that court, that they pulled back, and subsequently, the court approved their methods. so again, this is -- this won't necessarily deal with the extent with which american intelligence agencies are actually spying on foreign leaders. >> okay, tom ackerman, thank you very much, indeed. >> was it a simple car crash or a point to drive home a point by choinchinese ethnic minority? in china am teenen men square. reporting from hong kong. >> around the square normally subjected t
. >> reporter: national security agency chief keith alexander said european partners have not been shy about spying on the u.s. alexander was questioned by minnesota republican michele bachmann. >> is it your experience that allies of the united states have spied on the united states historically? >> yes. >> or even as we speak? >> yes. >> reporter: alexander denied stories based on leaks from former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden that the n.s.a. has collected the phone numbers of millions of citizens in france, spain, and italy. alexander said that data was passed to the u.s. by european intelligence agencies. >> to be perfectly clear, this is not information that we collect the on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> reporter: now, there is strong sentiment in congress to rein in the powers of n.s.a. by prohibiting the mass collection of u.s. phone records but intelligence warned today, scott, that could put the country at higher risk. >> pelley: they made history agai
underway to identify the suspects. >>> new pictures are released of the former national security agency worker edward snowden, revelations that the nsa spied on germany's chancellor angela merkel have proadvocated outrage in the country. >>> french police have released a sketch of a man wanted for the murder of a family in the alps, a shooting that is still unexplained. >>> a dutch children's rights organization is warning of what it describes as an e epidemic of youngsters being forced to perform sexual acts. handed those names to interpol. >> she is the weapon against sex traffic, she is not real. prowling the web for sex, one group trying to end it all. these are some of the men who have been identified as terrorists. researchers log on to chattel rooms pretending to be young girls. within seconds they are being offered money in return for things we cannot repeat. >> whenever i open a chat room dozens of men swarm at me within minutes. from families, good jobs, they're athletes, it's unbelievable how diverse the pattern is. >> this is one of the chat rooms the team are using. 10 f ph
by the documents you have gotten better from the national security agency. we have gone through some of the points. you begin with ban ki-moon last april. why don't you start there. >> i used to be with "the baltimoresun" and i wrote back in 1985 and can say i was not shocked about any of this, but i think perhaps one of the most interesting questions these documents raise is i refer to the agency as an omnivore. they're under pressure from policymakers, from the white house, see -- cia, dod to the state department to sort of the prepared to supply information on almost anything. inrisis breaks out tomorrow an unexpected place, and nsa is under heavy pressure to produce intelligence from that place. and that combined with a big- budget in secrecy has, i think, created what actually secretary of state john kerry was saying last week automatic pilot, sort to snatch upeffort any kind of electronic communication there is around the world. i thought the ban ki-moon example was interesting. thank you men, the secretary- general to the u.n., very -- bany to the u.s. -- a ki-moon, secretary-general to the
. >> lawmakers are expected to introduce a bill occur tailing the national security agencies powers to indiscriminately collect personal information. the u.s.a. freedom act is authored by patrick lay he. >> i did would provide stronger restrictions and require the government to delete information it collects accidentally more aggressively than it does now. the bill has a dozen co sponsors in the senate and 70 in the house. meanwhile, senator dianne feinstein, the democratic head of the senate intelligence committee, who has been a staunch defender of the n.s.a. is among those criticizing the agencies monitoring of world leaders like german chancellor angela merkel. insta statement, she said: the white house says president obama was not aware of just how extensive the n.s.a.'s intelligence gathering was until this summer, but the president insists there will be a complete review of the n.s.a.'s spying policy. >> what we've seen over the last several years is their pass has continued to develop and expand and that's why i'm initiating now a review to make sure that what they're able t
or democrat. people are more dependent now. >>> a new report says the national security agency is monitoring e-mails and other information on google and yahoo. the "washington post" says the agency tapped into cables around the world. that is according to secret documents from nsa leaker edward snowden. the nsa is rejecting allegations that it spied on the vatican. officials say the story from an italian magazine are not true. >>> the boston red sox are world champions once again. they beat the st. louis cardinals last night 6-1. it is boston's world series win. mark strassmann is inside fenway park. >> good morning, charlie. what a night here in fenway park as inning by inning pitch by pitch the crowd in here stood up and got louder waiting for the magical moment. >> the red sox are world champions! >> bedlam boston the final pitch with koji uehara thousands of fans poured into the streets to celebrate the historic championship. it is the first time in 95 years the red sox have won the world series in fenway park. david ortiz was the series mvp. >> thi
of the national security agency says reports of widespread phone tapping overseas are not true. meanwhile, a proposed bill in congress would sale back some of the n.a.a.'s powers. >> confident and almost defiant, the nation's top spy chiefs made no apologies, vigorously defending the job they do to keep america and its allies safe. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. they didn't stop hating us. they didn't say that they were going to just forget this. they continued to try. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. natio
briefly current national security agency practices. including its bulk data collection programs and the implication these programs have tube for the privacy of nevadans and millions of other law-abiding citizens. due to published reports in newspapers rander around the wo, nevadans are well-aware that the federal government has been collecting phone data of law-abiding citizens without their knowledge. these practices are mostly authorized by section 215 of the patriot act. specifically, section 215 permits the f.b.i. to seek a court order directing a business to turn over certain records when there are reasonable grounds to believe that the information sought is relevant to an authorized investigation of international terrorism. madam president, relevance has been found by the courts to be a broad standard that, in effect, allows large volumes of data to be collected. these same records can be combed through in order to identify smaller amounts of information that are relevant to an ongoing investigation. so to put it in other words, it's been aestablished that section 215 allo
security agency is denying reports the spy agency tapped into google and yahoo data centres around the world. a report in the "the washington post" cited documents leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden. the latest allegations comes as a delegation from the european parliament is visiting washington to investigate claims of eavesdropping on european leaders and citizens. >> it became clear that the damage, image damage for the united states is so high something has to be done on that. i hope it will be successful because we need messages for our people that without purpose it cannot happen - or on citizens. >> people in kenya are calling for the government to take action against men who gang-raped a 16-year-old girl. in nairobi protesters gathered at freedom park and marched to police headquarters and demanded justice. let's look at the case and why it triggered anger. in june 6th men attacked a girl, known to the media assist liz. in a dune of busia. they then threw her into a pit, a latrine. a day later three men were handed in to the police. they were told to cut the gra
officials on national security agency intelligence and surveillance programs. later, a hearing on the september shooting at the washington navy yard. >> reinforcing her reputation as a silent partner, she once was asked about her role as first lady and replied through a secretary, no comment. watch today at 11:00 a.m. on c-span. monday night our series continues. >> i was surrounded by a few of the items that kept her on the 10 best-dressed list. she worked with molly for her day outfits and this is what she wore to the st. lawrence seaway where they met prince phillip. another custom designed address is -- dress is a printed cotton fabric with many of the thousands the eisenhowers lived in during their marriage and includes the five stars for general eisenhower. she was very fond of the color pink and wore it in many different shades and styles. jackie kennedy is well known for the little black dress and here are two examples of mamie's little black dress. she always said she would never dress like an old lady. these gowns she wore in her 70's and 80's show her love of bright
the national security agency spying scandal, for want of a better word. all this news that the u.s. conducted surveillance on our own allies. some of the documents posted by or leaked by edward snowden to the media indicate that these programs started in 2002. why spy on an ally? >> jake, if there were such a program, it would be classified and i couldn't talk about it. it would be totally inappropriate, and i haven't been in the loop now obviously for more than four years. so it's just one of those subjects i couldn't discuss. >> without getting specific, on a theoretical basis, what is the interest of the united states in conducting surveillance on a country who is a clear ally of the united states? >> i've got to go with the answer i have given you. let me say this. we do have a fantastic intelligence capability worldwide against all kinds of potential issues and concerns. we are vulnerable, as was shown on 9/11, and you never know what you're going to need when you need it. the fact is, we do collect a lot of intelligence and without speaking about any particular target or group of target
around the world will be making their own decisions. the director of the national security agency has been before a congressional committee this week taking direct questions about how his department collects intelligence. >> journalists who published snowden's leaked documents told cnn he does not believe general keith alexander when he insists the nsa is following rules. >> he's being very specific and talking particularly about the reports of earlier this week, tens of millions of phone calls in france and spain, and he said it's completely false. what is your reaction to that? >> notice what he did not off, any evidence for the truth of what he's saying this is, remember, an agency that is extremely beleaguered in the middle of an intense scandal, both at home and abroad. it is an agency whose top officials have a record of lying to the congress and to the american people through the media, including general alexander. and these claims, which i was astonished to watch journalists yesterday go on television and treat as though they were the gospel are accusations made without eviden
are emerging about the national security agency's massive spying operation. according to "the washington post," the nsa secretly broke into the main communications links that connect yahoo! and google data centers around the world. and the italian media is reporting that the nsa spied as well on the vatican, spying on both pope benedict and pope francis. the nsa has now just issued an outright denial of the italian media reports. and unless you think the united states is alone in spying efforts, the russians are trying to keep up with us. russian operatives reportedly handing out goody bag to world leaders who were attending september's g-20 summit meeting. it turns out the russians were giving the delegates souvenir usb drives, phone chargers and teddy bears they had bugged. they bugged a teddy bear. who would have imagined? the russians deny the italian media report. joining us for more on benghazi and other foreign policy challenges facing the nation, general jack keen, retired four-star army general, former army vice chief of staff, fox news military analyst. general, great to have you wi
? >> brooke, you're absolutely right. we cannot dispense what the national security agency -- i spent my entire career going after human sources. at the end of the day, it was the national security agency which kept us safe. let's don't damage this organization. let's just try to clean it up. >> bob baer, thank you very much. and the name marilyn tavenner may not ring a bell with anyone, but she's in the spotlight today. she's in charge of the agency that created the healthcare.gov website. the very same website that has been universally criticized and mocked ever since it went live. today's hearing started with "i'm sorry." >> we know that consumers are eager to purchase this coverage, and to the millions of americans who have attempted to use healthcare.gov to shop and enroll in healthcare coverage, i want to apologize to you that the website has not worked as well as it should. >> from there, marilyn tavenner offered a steady defense of the overall obama care program. the website will be fixed, she promised, and in the long run more americans will have better coverage. cnn investigati
on with the national security agency. mr. secretary, to start with you, because you jointly oversea the nsa and as a senior member of the national security committee, clearly, this is in your portfolio as well, so what did you know about collection of intelligence from world leaders communications whether it was data or whatever it was, what did you know about it? when did you know about it, and have you discussed it with the president and feel it appropriate? why is it appropriate? mr. minister, how worried is your government that the united states is intercepting communications, and what does this do to new zealand's trust with the u.s.. first, mr. secretary. >> barbara, i don't discuss conversations i have in national security counsel meetings. i certainly don't discuss publicly conversations that we have regarding intelligence. we are examining dynamics out there and procedures and processes, i think, the white house has been very clear on that; and i think those who lead intelligence community even very clear on that. we have great respect for our partners, allies who cooperate with us
phone calls by millions of europeans. the national security agency director alexander testified yesterday on capitol hill that european spy agencies shared those records with the u.s. >> to be perfectly clear this is not information we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> at another hearing, national sbel intelligence directors was asked about monitoring allies. he said american friends spy on the united states. >> some of this reminds me of the classic movie casablanca. there's gambling going on here. it's the same thing. >>> john miller is here. >> good morning. clapper used the same one i used monday. either we think a like or he's a viewer. >> which is it? >> in the name of full discloe disclosure disclosure, he was my old boss before this job. >> let's get to the point. we do it to them; they do it to us. is there something special aboutnyabout germany and chancellor merkel that makes them want to pay more attention to her? >>
captioning institute] >> on the next "washington journal" we discuss national security agency surveillance and intelligence programs for gathering information within the u.s. and abroad. author and global strategies managing director michael allen. fda recentat the recommendation to tighten the policy on painkillers, the most frequently prescribed drugs in the united states. we are joined by very -- barry meier. "washington journal" here on c- span. c-span, we bring public affairs offends from washington directly to you, thank you in the room at congressional hearings, white house events, reviews and conferences, and offering complete babel to gavel coverage of the u.s. house, all as a public service of private industry. c-span, created by the cable tv industry and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. you can watch us in hd. secretary of state john kerry spoke today at a white house summit on business investment. secretary kerry spoke about the administration's stance on free trade and the state department role in foreign business investment. it was cohosted by the u.s. commer
the white house has. norah and charlie? >> major, thank you. the national security agency director general alexander said europeans actually shared those phone records with the u.s. >> to be perfectly clear, this is not information that we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> at another hearing clapper was asked about allies. he said they monitored allies for decades and he said america's friends spy on the united states. >> some of this reminds me of a lot of the movie of "cass a playablanca "casablanca." my god, there's gambling going on here? that's the same thing. >> that's a pretty good line. >> either we think alike or he's a viewer. >> which is it? >> in the name of full disclosure, he was my old boss before this job. >> you think alike. they do it to them they do it to us. >> if you sit on the president's briefing every day, the hot button items are terrorism, nuclear prolive nation a lot about the situation in syria. germa
't he know? the larger question is do we have an out of control national security agency? do we have a secret government in the shadows of government that the president of the united states and elected official doesn't know about. >> so we are feeding from the south of france. hear groaning. so, mika, thank you so much for showing up and you just pop right in. god knows we need somebody defending me this morning given all the things going on. >> okay. couple of things. stwargt the bush administration so i guess you could ask if president bush knew too and put those questions to him as well. >> what started in the bush administration. >> this monitoring of phone calls. >> of foreign leaders. >> if i may -- oh, wait dew point me to talk. i can go back to the south of france. >> i want you to educate what report suggests that george w. bush tapped the phones of world leaders? >> when did this start? >> four or five years ago. >> 2002. >> 2002. >> the tapping of foreign leaders. >> yes. so you have to apply the same questions to president bush, first of all, whether they do or do not kn
website problems. and then also with the national security agency and the spying surveillance of our allies. there have been criticisms of him as disengaged. were you -- >> that is the furthest from the truth about the president. i used to see him every morning. i used to see him every morning, three or four times during the day, and every evening before i went out. when i see him every morning, he had read all the material that was presented to him by everybody. and he knew going into the meeting what the assumption of the other side of the argument was, why he wanted to -- exactly what question said he wanted about whether it was on economic policy or foreign policy, so the idea that he would be disengaged is unless something happened, i have never seen in the two years of intensity when i was there, i just don't buy it. >> so a very forceful defense of president obama by his first white house chief of staff. one other thing that was interesting is mayor emanuel when he was chief of staff, brooke, he was very open about suggesting that there not be this very ambitious widespread at
, quote, national security justification for the agency's surveillance for combating terrorism against democratically elected leaders and private businesses. the general apparently didn't like the response or liked the question and tersely responded to him. what about this, is he right to ask this question? >> i think the question was extremely naive. he was right to ask the question but the reality is we live in a rough and tumble world and the u.s. has to have an aggressive intelligence operation. i'll give you one, terrorism. there's many states that are a good friend of ours. they're not incarcerated. they're not monitoring terrorists who may be planning attacks on the united states. we're completely within our rights to do what we have to do. to defend the homeland against such threats. >> from what i'm hearing, both of you agree with what the general has said about nsa's conducting surveillance, yet secretary of state kerry recently said the surveillance activity happened on a kind of autopilot within the nsa, without the knowledge of senior officials within the obama administrat
an organized crime, i can say this gangster is a threat to national security, and collection, but could not help us in our criminal case. 9/11, much was made about the culture of the agencies, and that was nonsense. spike and i formed partnership 1990's, and after these directives had gone out wouldcome law, nobody trust able legal, fundamental fact of our system, called the fourth amendment. when you're going to prosecute someone for a cruel case in the united states, the defendant is entitled to know how you investigate. how did you open it, what techniques did you use? wiretapping come a what was the basis of it? limited miniscule amount of information, the identity of a confidential informant that might have been used, could be withheld. defendant is a much entitled to everything. the agency is required to open the defense attorneys, to allow the defendant to see that. these directives, including the not, should did not, and will never address that. when we started to try to develop the system to work together, law enforcement and community, we were trying to figure out how this wou
complicated and chaotic budget process that i think our national security has seen since the end of world war ii. that is a huge period with lots of -- dod is the most sophisticated of the government agencies. it works also something called the future years defense budget. 5, 6 years in the making long- range decisions that the secretaries look at. they were able to do it in a strategic environment and set the direction for budget alterations and execute them across a decade. now, we have gone from the period of the five-year defense plan to continuing resolutions which were for a while six months. now there are four months in duration. add to that the sequester which is the product of the debt ceiling compromise two years ago. to quote leon panetta as he was the parting as secretary of defense, he said we can no longer go from budget crisis to budget crisis. he said this is not a game. that coming from a secretary of defense who had unique skills, but perhaps our shrewdest budget expert in the government. figuring out a path forward in terms of how to create budget stability -- one last comm
serious a threat is that to national security? >> this is the most serious leak, the most serious compromise of classified information in the history of the u.s. intelligence agency. >> >> miller: because of the amount of it or the type in >> the amount and the type. ♪ ♪ >> simon: the phrase "the greatest show on earth" usually refers to the circus, but man named peter gelb who runs the metropolitan opera in new york city is doing everything he can to change that. there's no other place where you can see such monumental staging, elaborate sets and a cast of hundreds. but the met is above all about extraordinary voices, some of the best voices in the world. tonight we're going to take you backstage at the met and show it to you in a way you've never seen it before. >> i'm steve kroft. >> i'm lesley stahl. >> i'm morley safer. >> i'm bob simon. >> i'm lara logan. >> i'm scott pelley. those stories tonight on "60 minutes." >> cbs money watch update sponsored by: >> glor: good evening. the fed meets this week and is expected to maintain its current bond-buying program, currently $
of senator barack obama in 2007. but that was then, this is now. the n.s.a., national spy agency, as i call it, is continuing its stealth intrusion into the lives of not only americans but foreign leaders as well. that senator obama once talked about. the n.s.a. has been caught evening dropping on the germans, french, and now news reports say 60 million phone calls in spain were monitored by n.s.a. a bit more history about the n.s.a. and their spying. the department of justice stealthly seized information from 20 different associated press reporters or press phone lines, including some in the u.s. capitol, right up there. the department of justice stealthly seized phone records of fox news reporter, james rosen, his parents, and several fox news phone lines. in the month of january of 2013 billion phone calls were monitored worldwide, and at least three billion of them were phone calls in america. the n.s.a. stealthly seized from verizon business network services millions of telephone records, including the location, numbers, and time of domestic calls. a secret government program called, p
with the security agencies and intelligence agencies of other nations, of allied nations. i'm not going to get into the specific alleged activities, intelligence activities, of the united states or our allies. we're obviously more broadly engaged in a review as i discussed at length yesterday of our intelligence gathering activities, mindful of the fact that because of the explosion in our technological capacities , we need to look at and make sure that we are not just gathering intelligence because we can, but we're gathering it because we need it specifically and that review is under way at the president's direction and will be completed by the end of the year. >> one of the things that officials say of the review is the surveillance of allied heads of state. is the administration's plan to conduct this review and tell the public of its outcomes all at once or is it possible that we could learn in the coming days or a shorter time frame of the decision on that specific program ahead of speed, surveillance? >> i think generally speaking you should expect it upon conclusion of the review. we w
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